Find Your Ancestors

Arabs Who Lived in New York City, 1880-1900

Linda K. Jacobs

Below is a series of spreadsheets listing the first Arab immigrants to emigrate to New York City in the late 19th Century. Linda K. Jacobs created these databases as part of the research for her book, Strangers in the West, which tells the story of the Syrian colony on the Lower West Side of Manhattan, where America’s first Arab immigrants settled between 1880 and 1900. This is an invaluable resource for Americans of Arab descent who want to trace their roots.

These sheets are being continuously updated, so check back frequently.

If you use data from these spreadsheets, please cite as: “Linda K. Jacobs, Strangers in the West: The Syrian Colony of New York City, 1880-1900. Accessed at www.KalimahPress.com.” Send comments and corrections to info@kalimahpress.com.

Here you can create the content that will be used within the module.

Sheet 1: Arabs Living in NYC, 1880-1900

This spreadsheet lists all of the Arabs who lived in NYC sometime between 1880 and 1900. Scroll through this database organized by surname for detailed demographic information, including the names of family members, immigration date, birth date, place of birth, religion, if known, and death date. Go to Sheet 4 on this page to find source material for this sheet.

Sheet 2: Syrians in the 1890 NYC Police Census

This spreadsheet lists all of the Arabs who were identified in the fragmentary 1890 NYC Police Census. It’s organized by surname and includes age, gender, and address for each person.

Sheet 3: Arabs in New York in the 1900 Federal Census

This spreadsheet lists all of the Arabs who were identified in the 1900 Federal census. It’s organized by surname and includes detailed demographic information, including the names of family members, home address, immigration date, occupation, and other useful data.

 

Sheet 4: Source Data

This spreadsheet lists the data sources for the main spreadsheet. It’s organized by surname and includes, home and business addresses, immigration date, occupation,  and source. There are also “research notes” sharing extra details about some of the people. Individuals often have dozens of entries, some of them duplicative, but each one reflecting a different source for the information. Spelling of names is not consistent, as names are spelled as they are on the original document.