KalimahPress Blog

A series on the early Arab immigrant experience

The Syrian Colony of Boston, 1890-1910

The Syrian Colony of Boston, 1890-1910

(Above): Syrian women sewing at Denison House, Boston, 1912. It is interesting to compare the Syrian colonies of New York City and Boston. Both cities were major ports in the nineteenth century and, along with Providence and Philadelphia, were east coast entry points...

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Repudiated by their Peers

Repudiated by their Peers

Why would two seemingly respectable Syrian immigrants be publicly repudiated by their countrymen? As everyone who reads this blog knows, I have an affection for, if not an obsession with, stories that seem to contradict the Syrian myth of success, assimilation, and...

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Naoum Mokarzel

Naoum Mokarzel

Naoum Mokarzel, a well-known editor and spokesman for the Maronite community in New York, had a tumultuous personal life.

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Chaldeans in America: The Oussani Family

Chaldeans in America: The Oussani Family

The Chaldeans, sometimes called Assyrians or Nestorians, are Christians from Iraq and other Middle Eastern countries, who claim to be among the first Christian converts. This is the story of the Oussani family from Baghdad, who were the first and only known Chaldeans to settle here before 1900.

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Midwives in the 19th century Syrian Colony of New York City

Midwives in the 19th century Syrian Colony of New York City

The history of midwifery in the United States and particularly in New York City is a vexed one. Midwifery was a common profession for immigrant and native women in nineteenth century America, one of the few where a woman worked for herself. This post explores the lives of several early Syrian midwives and how they fended for themselves in the new world.

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Click below to see a database of the first Arab immigrants to emigrate to the United States in the late 19th Century.
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